An Camas Mòr - a proposed New Community in the Highlands of Scotland
 
 
                 
 
 
Related Documents (pdf format):
Spaces for life
Mobility principles
The High Street
Public spaces in the High Street
Main Cross
Spaces for recreation and play
Spaces for contact with nature
Closer to nature
High Street
Side streets
Local bus route/service street
Local streets/cul de sacs
 
 
 
Proposed Layout
 
Compact
The plan for An Camas Mòr is based on the idea of the compact footprint.  The idea is that the majority of the settlement is within a radius of five minutes walking distance (or 400 metres).  This means that most local journeys would be short enough (in time and distance) to make walking the best option.  Important too is the idea of concentrating as much development as is reasonable, on as small an area as possible, to protect other more sensitive areas from unnecessary development in the future.
 
Design Origins
Traditional places most often grow up along routes, between other places.  In this way there is a potential to connect An Camas Mòr to the neighbouring settlements of Aviemore to the west and Coylumbridge to the south-east.  This notional route is an important ingredient in generating the plan form and it has the potential to become the direct walking route from the Speyside Way at Aviemore to the Lairig Ghru Pass through the Cairngorms to Braemar and Royal Deeside.
 
High Street
Taking inspiration from traditional Scottish towns, the main concept for the plan is to make a single main street, a ‘High Street’.  It seems logical that this would be orientated along the notional connecting route between Aviemore and Coylumbridge.  Additionally, this idea is reinforced by the study of traditional Scottish town plans, which shows that East to West is the favoured orientation of High Streets.
 
Curved Form
Again, study of traditional settlements shows that high streets are often gently curved to reduce the effect of wind, and vary in width - narrowing to reduce wind and widening to create sunny spaces.  These simple concepts have been included in the plan.
 
Higher Density Centre
The concept would be further developed by making assumptions of higher density and greater diversity along the High Street, allowing for slightly higher buildings, joined-up buildings and a range of other uses than residential.  The plan would allow for a concentration of services, employment and public buildings, as well as leisure facilities along the High Street.  The rest of the settlement relates to the High Street with side street connections, of different scales and characters, with narrower wynds and lanes, as well as wider streets to accommodate the distribution of traffic.  This ‘fish-bone’ plan is typical of traditional Scottish towns and villages.  The idea of the side streets would be to give every home in An Camas Mòr a direct relationship to the centre and therefore a clear sense of identity.  They would also allow almost every dwelling in the village to be within five minutes of the High Street.  The side streets would be staggered to reduce the negative effect of wind, as well as to reinforce the importance of the High Street as the main thoroughfare.
 
Influence of Topography
The topography of the site has had a great influence on the plan, with the contours effecting the routing of the High Street, as well as the significant landscape forms such as the characteristic topographical kettleholes generating open spaces.  Additionally existing mature trees have been incorporated within the plan.
 
Woodland Setting
The whole settlement would be placed in a woodland setting, by being surrounded by a woodland edge.  This gives a strong connection to the natural landscape, with views of trees at the end of every side street.  The woodland connection would be extended by the creation of forested wedges which penetrate deep into the plan, enhancing the sense of connection to nature.
 
Compact footprint - The small footprint and dense building pattern makes walking distances short, pleasant and safe. Notional route - A bicycle and pedestrian route, meandering through the recreational park, connects An Camas Mòr with Aviemore.

Compact footprint
The small footprint and dense building pattern makes walking distances short, pleasant and safe.

Notional route
A bicycle and pedestrian route, meandering through the recreational park, connects An Camas Mòr with Aviemore.
East-west Curved High Street - The curved High Street runs from east to west catching the sun throughout the day. Streets off the High Street - The streets off the High Streets would be shifted to prevent wind tunnels and create an interesting walk through the built fabric.
East-west Curved High Street
The curved High Street runs from east to west catching the sun throughout the day.
Streets off the High Street
The streets off the High Streets would be shifted to prevent wind tunnels and create an interesting walk through the built fabric.
Services along the High Street - Services, commercial and leisure uses would be concentrated along the High Street. Notional density - The build mass would be denser along the High Street and less dense towards the site edges.
Services along the High Street
Services, commercial and leisure uses would be concentrated along the High Street.
Notional density
The build mass would be denser along the High Street and less dense towards the site edges.
Topographical influence - Natural topographic elements would be preserved and used for recreation and play. Green edges and wedges - Green edges and wedges would shelter the community and would give close contact with nature from within.
Topographical influence
Natural topographic elements would be preserved and used for recreation and play.
Green edges and wedges
Green edges and wedges would shelter the community and would give close contact with nature from within.
Proposed layout
Design Team Draft Documents (Protected)